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How To Deliver Services Without Having To Be There

Having an Alpha 2.0 Business means having 100% location independent income. Most people understand the concept of being able to do this when you sell physical or digital products, but I’ve noticed a lot of people have trouble wrapping their heads around the concept of doing this when you sell a service, like when you’re a consultant or something similar.

When I started my first full-time business as a computer consultant I was the typical service provider in that I drove out to my clients’ offices every time they needed me. Sometimes that meant visiting four different offices per day.

I spent thousands of hours in my car. I still remember all those countless hours I spent during my twenties driving all over the place, heading to and from consulting appointments. The good news is that I was able to spend a lot of time listening to business cassette tapes (we had those back then) and CDs in my car. I was also able to charge for a percentage of that travel time. Regardless, I really would have preferred to have done that consulting and been paid for it without all that time in the car.

By the end of the 1990s we had ways of accessing clients’ computers without actually being there, but the systems were primitive and not easy to set up or use. Often the end-user had to do a bunch of things to let you into the computer. If that person wasn’t very computer literate it would be too complicated for them. If you set it up for them, it was easy for them to break. They also couldn’t help you if they were busy doing something else. So this lessened the driving load a little, but on-site visits were still mandatory.

A few years later we had systems like LogMeIn and GoToMyPC which made things a lot easier. You could actually access a remote computer without any humans on the other end doing anything. If I worked with a company fancy enough to have Wake-on-LAN systems, I could even turn the computer on remotely. Pretty cool.

I also started having clients of all types actually ship laptops to my office. I would work on them, turn them around the next day, and ship them back. If they were located in my city the computers would get there the next day. If they weren’t, it would take just a few days, or we shipped it “next day air” ir if it was needed. It worked surprisingly well.

It was around this time I started doing business consulting and time management consulting since I got tired of working on computers. All of my experiences above showed me that I could really help companies without ever stepping foot into their offices. I started closing deals in distant parts of the U.S. over the phone and email, and later, over video calls.

When I mastered this, I started doing the same thing internationally and started getting clients all over the world. I got a lumber company in Japan, a steel company in Finland, a hotel management company in Hong Kong, and so on, all without ever having to travel to their offices. I would simply gather all the information I needed by having them email it to me, or accessing it on their servers, and/or through interviews with their staff. I improved their companies, got paid, and never needed to leave my home to do it. It was a win for everyone.

I started to notice other people delivering services remotely. Bookkeepers, consultants, financial guys, and so on. I also started to meet creative Alpha Male 2.0 doctors who handled all of their patients 100% remotely. Using phone, emails, and video calls, they could serve their patients, give advice, write prescriptions, and ship them what they needed. Today, my testosterone doctor is 100% location independent.

So yeah, you can deliver all kinds of services and still be 100% location independent.

But Caleb, what if I’m a bricklayer? What if I own a janitorial service? Those can’t be location independent!

In those cases, the actual service can’t be location independent, but you can. Have subcontractors do the actual hands-on work while you manage the business, marketing, customer service, and the client relationship. These things pay more than the actual implementation of the service anyway. You don’t want to be the one cleaning toilets or laying bricks, right? You want to be the guy who gets paid by the customer and then pays the janitor or bricklayer a cut of what you receive. That’s being an entrepreneur. If you do that in a location independent fashion and have no employees (using subcontractors instead) that’s an Alpha 2.0 entrepreneur.

I’ve seen mental health firms, construction companies, pest control services, and many other types of businesses operate this way. It takes a little out-of-the-box thinking, but with today’s technology it’s not difficult at all.

In all seriousness, I have not yet encountered a business that couldn’t be made into a location independent version, given a little creativity. It’s certainly harder with some businesses than with others, that’s true. That’s why I like consulting so much. It’s extremely high-margin and can very easily be done in a location independent way.

At noon on June 18th I will have a free, live online training webinar where you will learn how to make a high income as a location independent consultant, with a full Q&A at the end. Click here to register. Right after it’s over, The Six Figure Location Independent Consultant Course goes on sale for just four days. Regardless of whether you want to be a consultant or not, location independent income, even when selling a service, isn’t very hard.

3 Comments

  1. notFmx

    Hi Caleb, nice insights here.

    Any experience in Project Management as a consultant ?

    One thing I noticed is that old school big companies tend to like having you on site in order to deliver your services and meet with the different teams. How do you convice them to work “your way”, when 90% of other consultants would not even bother and go on site ?

    I don’t know if things are different in the US, but here in Western Europe, traditionnal processes and way of working move very slow. Hard to change management habits.

    Moreover, how do you handle tricky situations, where you may need to go and meet some people in person to make the project move forward when things get stuck (very useful when you can just go to the open space next door to pressure a bit, sometimes).

    Do you have any thoughts regarding these aspects ?

    Thank you.

    • Caleb Jones

      Any experience in Project Management as a consultant ?

      Oh yes.

      One thing I noticed is that old school big companies tend to like having you on site in order to deliver your services and meet with the different teams. How do you convice them to work “your way”, when 90% of other consultants would not even bother and go on site ?

      You’re right. If you try to work with an giant, old-school bank for instance, you’re going to get a lot of resistance with the LI concept because of their outdated business SP. You’ll need to push them on the benefits, namely that there will be zero travel costs for you (they wont have to pay for plane tickets, hotel accommodations, meals, gas, etc) and you’ll be able to better focus on the work at hand since if you’re on-site you’ll constantly have their employees bugging you with questions, problems, and other distractions.

      I don’t know if things are different in the US, but here in Western Europe, traditionnal processes and way of working move very slow. Hard to change management habits.

      Yes, sometimes it won’t work. This is one of the reasons I’ve always leaned towards smaller companies. The inflexibility of larger corporations is irritating.

      Moreover, how do you handle tricky situations, where you may need to go and meet some people in person to make the project move forward when things get stuck (very useful when you can just go to the open space next door to pressure a bit, sometimes).

      If you WANT to fly out to your client’s offices, you may. I’ve certainly done that on occasion, but it was MY DECISION. The point is at point of acceptance on the contract you don’t HAVE TO. (Plus, because of coronavirus many executives are getting more comfortable with things like group Zoom calls, so it’s getting better.)

  2. notFmx

    Got it

    I’m in for the consultant course, curious to see how I’ll be able to put all that in practice in my niche. 🙂